A Costa Rican Wedding

Costa Rican social events are not for the fainthearted. They are looong. Just a few days ago on Monday I attended a local celebration for El Día del Trabajador (Labor Day) and it was from 8am-3pm.

In case you thought you had the whole day off, think again.

Local celebrations usually start with a few hours of mixing and mingling, 2-3 hours of people talking into microphones giving what feels like drawn-out unsolicited Oscar acceptance speeches and then afterwards, the sleepy audience is revived with a lunch (you guessed it, arroz con pollo) and a cafecito (coffee) and snack even before the afternoon meal is fully digested.

So when I got invited to my first wedding, I knew I had to prepare myself mentally.

Which I did not do by going to church that very same Sunday morning.

In Costa Rica, wedding ceremonies are held in the local church and the reception usually takes place at the family’s residence.

But this wedding was a little different. Continue reading

#FoodFriday: The Fruits and Flavors of Fila Naranjo (Part 2)

It’s guayaba season here in Fila Naranjo, which means the trees are full of this fresh, delicious fruit and the grounds are covered in old, mushy, ripe guayabas that have matured and created a soft, slippery, fermented rug that covers all the land here in the beautiful mountains of Costa Rica.

Before coming to Fila Naranjo, I had never had a guayaba (guava) in my life. I had tasted guava juice, guava kombucha, guava flavored jellies and jams, but never had the real deal. Guava kombucha is one of my favorites, I love the floral, unique, semi-acidic flavor of guayaba so when I first spotted a guayaba tree here, I was stoked.

I plucked one straight from the tree in the middle of long, laborious day working at the finca and held it up to my nose for just a minute to breathe in the aroma. It was such a Peace Corps moment. Here I was, working in the fields alongside a group of local women and I stumble upon a fresh fruit tree. How cool is this?! This is why you’re here Tily, for these small beautiful organic moments. I embraced the moment so hard I took a seat under the guava tree and ate 4 guavas. Can you believe it?! Four.

After scarfing down my fill of guayabas, I headed back up to the other side of the finca to find a few ladies doing the same. But it was the weirdest thing, they were all pulling apart the fruit and throwing the middle seeded part onto the ground. I asked one of them if she was throwing out the middle because she didn’t like the texture of the seeds and then…I learned what gusano meant.

Gusano is the Spanish word for worm or maggot. When guayabas turn the slightest bit soft, fruit flies lay their eggs beneath the fruit’s skin and the maggots are born inside and feed on the fruit’s succulent flesh. Continue reading

On Being Ama de Casa

Ama de Casa is title widely used in Costa Rica to describe the role of the woman whose job is to stay at home and care for the house, the children, and oftentimes here, the grandchildren.


The word “ama” is a noun and translates to:

  • Lady of the house
  • Owner
  • Governess
  • Foster mother
  • Housewife
  • Housekeeper

I know…the dictionary literally put them in that order. It kinda goes downhill from lady of the house. Continue reading