Monthly Update: #1

Today marks the day that I have officially been in site for one month, whoo! I surprise myself by saying that time has actually gone by pretty fast. **knock on wood**


Like I’m sure many Peace Corps Volunteers can attest to, the first few weeks of arriving at site can be kind of [insert emotionally overwhelming synonym here]. You’ve left your new friends, the busy training schedule, and that cozy life you just built for yourself over the past three months during pre-service training only to wake up alone in an unfamiliar place surrounded by flying insects, people, and a language that you don’t really know. It’s a big change.

13221731_10206347133303732_5809738580905176037_n
Adiós clase de Español

For Community Economic Development Volunteers, the first 3 months in site are supposed to be spent assessing and getting to know your community. This was the part of Peace Corps that always terrified me. The first few months of arriving in site that are solely for integrating. Nothing to really do, nowhere to really go. Just integrateContinue reading

#FoodFriday: The Fruits and Flavors of Fila Naranjo (Part 1)

I love fruit. I LOOOVE fruit. And vegetables. And coffee. I love all things fresh, delicious, crunchy, soft, gooey, acidic, tart, earthy, juicy, fleshy (just for you papaya), bubbly, spicy…the list goes on.  I love all the tastes and textures.

So when I got my site assignment for Fila Naranjo and read that it was a small coffee farming community in the mountains of Costa Rica my heart melted into a pool of dark chocolate fondue. Endless amounts of coffee? Fresh homegrown Costa Rican coffee? That was all I needed and all I wanted. It was enough to keep me satisfied for the next 2 years. I was happy…I was extática…with coffee.

But once I got to site, I discovered that the sweet, pure, fertile tierra of Fila Naranjo sprouted so much more than just the best coffee in the world. You name it, we got it. We’re like the expensive produce aisle in Whole Foods that everyone walks through but can’t commit to making a purchase. You might put that $6 exotic dragon fruit in your cart but you know you’re going to take it out once you get to the check-out and slip it behind the kombucha cooler.

Continue reading